Tag: BBN

Pixies, Snail Tipping, & a Small Monster

Pixies, Snail Tipping, & a Small Monster

It’s short story week, and I’ve jumped into a little backstory to the BBN (Big Bad Novel). Just straight to the story here, or read on for ramblings!


Poor wee snails. Pixies should be ashamed of themselves.

I keep heading back to the BBN, because I like it over there. I know the characters, and they’re fun to hang out with, plus they have so much going on that just has no real bearing on the BBN itself, yet which make for entertaining stories (in my humble opinion, at least). And all the ingredients of this story really just felt as if they belonged quite nicely in the world of the BBN.

As to where the ingredients came from – honestly, I have no idea where the monster in the bathtub came from. I can’t remember. If it was from a tweet, thank you to whoever tweeted it. If it wasn’t – well, no idea. The snail tipping I do remember, however. I was horribly tired, and trying to say something about nail clippings (why, I’m not sure. I’m okay with not knowing that one). In my tiredness that became snail tipping, which led to a discussion with the SO about snail-tipping pixies, because of course it did. And because that was too appealing an idea to be left alone, it made its way over here.

So read on, enjoy, and watch out for those young pixie hooligans…

A Monster in the Bathtub

All she wanted was a nice peaceful bath…
Making A Habit of It

Making A Habit of It

Become a monk, they said. It’ll be fun, they said. No one said anything about sunset walks in what is obviously dragon country.

Habit. All sorts of connotations in such a little word.

You’ve got a monk’s habit, which conjures up thoughts of self-deprivation and piousness, of scratchy brown robes and hand-tended gardens.

Bad habits – oh, so many of those. Biting your nails. Smoking. Picking your spots. Dog-earing book pages (shudder).

Good habits – putting money aside for rainy days. Brushing your teeth before bed. Switching the TV off at the wall rather than leaving it on standby.

Habits drive the world. If we had to think about every little action – do I brush my teeth now? Do I do it later? After I switch the TV off? Before I let the cat out? After I have a tea? – we’d be in a state of constant overload, questioning the smallest thing. Habits are our brain’s shortcuts, the quick fixes that free us up to think about other, more important things, such as if we’ve got time for another chapter before bed, or what we think the next season of GoT will bring. They’re the ingrained background actions of our lives, humming along silently almost below our consciousness.

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Advice on Writing Advice

Advice on Writing Advice

 

Easy.

​When I wrote the rough draft of my books, it was by hand, with iffy internet. I didn’t read any articles about how I should do it, I just did it, for better or worse.

For years this has been pretty much how my writing has gone. I started out writing longhand, figuring it out as I went, and as back then all my writing was for me, it didn’t matter. I told my stories and made my bad jokes, and popped them in a drawer. When I last tried writing novels, I was in a pretty bad place personally, and I’m actually quite grateful I never delved into the online writing world, such as it may have been back then. I was tearing myself apart quite well enough without reading about all the things I was doing wrong.

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Broken Stories

Broken Stories

I should write notes to myself more often.

​Today is short story day. That’s what the more obsessive part of my brain keeps telling me over and over: Today is short story day because last week was blog week and we’re alternating these things dammit so why aren’t you writing a short story and you’re better at stories than blog posts so why aren’t you writing a short story?

And, with the greatest compassion, I’m going to have to tell that part of my brain to bugger off for a bit.

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Why write?

Why write?

Ooh, look – a road! Shall we see where it goes? (Tolkien was right about roads, by the way. They’re dangerous things).

I’ve had a lot of jobs along the way. I never got as far as a career – in fact I left university after my first year to take a break while I figured out what I really wanted to do, and just never went back. Since then I’ve taught diving, taught sailing, taught yoga, been a personal trainer, a bookshop owner, cooked in a variety of places both on and off the water, been a bosun on a superyacht and delivery crew on smaller ones, as well as some odd interim stints working in a bar in a rough part of London and an off-license in a nice part of Salisbury. I guess you could say I’ve been a little lacking in direction, although I’d also argue that it’s all life experience, which is no bad thing. I’ve learned a lot about what I like and don’t like, but more than that, I’ve learned what the one thing I love is. The one thing that I can’t ever seem to get bored of.

No prizes for guessing what it is.

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