Tag: reading

Weird Things in My Kindle TBR

Weird Things in My Kindle TBR

Book hoarding. YESSS.

I’ve had a Kindle (other ereaders are also available, apparently), in one form or another, for at least eight years or so. My original Kindle, in fact, I sent to my dad when I ‘upgraded’ to a Kindle Fire. That Kindle Fire has now become a Spotify machine which crashes regularly, and the Kindle Fire that followed (which has the worst battery life imaginable and crashes regularly) has been relegated to use for YouTube workout videos, replaced by a Kindle Paperwhite. Meanwhile, Dad’s still using that that first Kindle. I kind of messed that one up.

Anyhow, I did one of those “I have so much stuff on here, what is it all?” things (of course, I know there are at least six versions of the WIP, but there is so much more on my Kindle. So much more).

Friends, do not ask this question lightly.

I thought that, other than the many copies of various versions of the WIP, that there were certain things I could expect:

  • Several Learn French books because I have good intentions, mostly never opened because I have terrible follow through.
  • A large collection of classics, because as above. Plus they’re free.
  • A very large collections of BookBub buys, because when I first found Bookbub I bought something off almost every email. Every daily email. Some were free, some weren’t. A fairly large proportion of them are unopened, and a reasonable portion of the opened ones I never finished.
  • A substantial collection of books I actually bought and read.

So, yes, I was prepared for those.

However, some things I was not prepared for.

Allow me to present:

A Tour Through the Weird Books I Thought I Needed.

 

Decorative Napkin Folding for Beginners.

“Napkins are easy to fold into ingenious shapes and add a tough of festivity to any dinner. Whether you use paper or cloth, a napkin folded into a delightful shape is a welcome way to start a meal.”

I do not know why I thought I needed this. Many years ago I did a combination of cooking and stewardessing aboard small boats, and did on occasion need to fold a napkin, although mostly my partner at the time took care of that sort of thing. This was many years before Kindle, though, and it is not an aspect of the job I miss.

However, if I ever decide to buy a dining table and have a dinner party, I will be able to fold paper or material napkins into festive shapes. Which is handy. (And, apparently, my guests “will have as much fun trying to figure out how you did it as you did in the making.” Good times.)

 

Taste: The Story of Britain Through its Cooking.

“In this involving history of the British people, Kate Colquhoun celebrates every aspect of our cuisine from Anglo-Saxon feasts and Tudor banquets, through the skinning of eels and the invention of ice cream, to Dickensian dinner-party excess and the growth of frozen food.”

To be fair, this actually sounds quite interesting, but I don’t know why I thought I’d read it. It’s one of those books I look at in a bookshop, think it sounds clever, then put it down again. The odds of me learning about the history of Britain through the medium of food are – wait. Hang on, I just realised the attraction. Okay, I won’t delete this one.

 

Don’t Throw It, Grow It!: 68 windowsill plants from kitchen scraps.

“Don’t throw out your kitchen scraps — grow them! Discover how you can transform leftover pomegranate seeds, mango pits, and dried bits of gingerroot into thriving plants. From the common carrot to the exotic cherimoya, you’ll be amazed at the gardening possibilities hidden in the foods you eat.”

Delusions of grandeur. I don’t even know what a cherimoya is. And I can’t keep actual plants from garden centres alive, so I have doubts about my ability to coax life from garden scraps. It seems that, at times, I see myself as having a domestic goddess side. I’m pretty certain this is incorrect.

 

How to Stay Sane: The School of Life, Book 6.

“There is no simple set of instructions that can guarantee sanity.”

I can’t help but feel this book is poorly named. “How to Possibly Stay a Little Sane” might fit more with that blurb. Not that I’ve read it, because apparently this was not a high priority read for me. I’d also like to know why I didn’t start with Book 1. That might have been something handy, like “How to Adult”.

 

Writing a Novel & Getting Published for Dummies.

“If you’ve always wanted to write that great novel, but never knew where to start, look no further! Taking you step by step from concept to contract, this book provides the tools you need to tell your story with skill and approach agents and publishers with confidence.”

Ahahahahahaha.

Well, we always hope there’s a secret, right? A magic formula that we just have to discover? A secret code, a hidden map, a… book for dummies?

 

I also discovered an astonishing amount of cosy mysteries, both read and not, as well as a perfectly ridiculous number of zombie books. Apparently I’ve been searching for the perfect zombie-cosy mystery crossover for quite some time.

I won’t mention the large assortment of books that I actually already own in hard copy, though…

 

Correct.

 

What about you? Have you made any mystifying finds on your Kindle (substitute ereader of choice here)?

The Joys of Old Sci-Fi Books (& Covers)

The Joys of Old Sci-Fi Books (& Covers)

In which I show off a slightly haphazard collection of old Pan C.S. Lewis and Penguin John Wyndham sci-fi, and try to justify their purchase as an exercise in learning about humanity through the writings of old sci-fi writers, rather than just because I like the wonderfully trashy covers.

What? I never said I had fancy tastes.

 

 

What about you? Do you like old sci-fi, or old books in general? What’s your weakness when it comes to books? (Other than just, well, books…)

 

The Phantom Tollbooth & Why I Read Past the First Chapter

The Phantom Tollbooth & Why I Read Past the First Chapter

In which I talk about a book that I can’t actually remember very well, but that I know I loved as a kid. I also blame it for why I have guilt over DNF (did not finish) books.

Well, not really. I actually thank it for teaching me to always give a book a reasonable chance, but the other way sounds more interesting.

 

 

Do you put books down unfinished? Why or why not? And what’s something that a book’s taught you? Let me know in the comments!

 

Science-y Books for Non-Science-y People

Science-y Books for Non-Science-y People

In which I admit that although I own two copies of Cosmos, I haven’t read either, but have read other Carl Sagan books that I don’t own.

And I talk about other science-y books that are a good fit for my fairly un-science-y brain, and get a little over-excited by the fact that the universe is just generally pretty amazing.

 

 

Do you read science books (-y or otherwise)? Have you read any of these? Let me know your thoughts and recommendations in the comments!

 

Tove Jansson & Beautiful Books

Tove Jansson & Beautiful Books

Stumbling my way through another chat about books, where I admit I still read books for very small children and have a soft spot for Nordic melancholia. I also show you pretty pictures, so there’s that.

 

 

Have you read any Tove Jansson? Any other kids’ books you like revisiting, and would like to recommend?

Don’t forget to ask if there’s anything in particular you’d like me to natter on about!

 

Stuff for Sunday – Chemicals, Inspiration, & Flowers

Stuff for Sunday – Chemicals, Inspiration, & Flowers

Ah, Sunday. Time for this week’s collection of the weird and wonderful, where I share with you all the weird and wonderful things I’ve come across this week.

Well, maybe not all of them. This is a PG site, after all.

 

 

The Paris Review: What’s Inspiration, Anyway?

“You cannot write a poem until you hit upon its rhythm. That rhythm not only belongs to the subject matter, it belongs to your interior world, and the moment they hook up there’s a quantum leap of energy. Yow can ride on that rhythm, it will carry you somewhere strange. The next morning you look at the page and wonder how it all happened. You have to triumph over all your diurnal glibness and cheapness and defensiveness.”

The full article is paywalled, but there’s a lot that you can still read on the site free.

 

 

The Big Think: What All Those Chemicals On the Periodic Table Do

Never mind the fact that I won’t remember any of them five minutes later, it has cool pictures!

“Impress your friends and yourself by learning the applications of astatine (radioactive medicine), molybdenum (cutting tools like scissors), krypton (flashlights) and other elements.”

 

 

The Guardian: Quentin Blake on Illustrating New Roald Dahl Characters

“I was able to get really close to the Minpins themselves. Dahl mentions them having old-fashioned costumes, in brown and black, of two or three hundred years ago, and I suppose my Minpins are in a sort of confused 17th-century attire. They are also described as having eccentric headwear – another rewarding opportunity. And they are referred to as being present in thousands: that is easier for a writer than an illustrator. I hope I may be forgiven in the pictures for them being merely numerous.”

 

 

Flavorwire: Underwater Photos of Flowers Gone Wild

Not that sort of wild.

Although, they’re flowers. Being wild probably just involves them flinging pollen around with abandon.

 

 

 

What weird and wonderful things have you discovered this week?

 

Friday Frivolities – People Try Books

Friday Frivolities – People Try Books

I have seen the future, and it is terrifying. Or at least I hope it’s the future, and not an upcoming documentary.

Admittedly, I have seen books being sold by the metre, to really set off that new living room or landing, so maybe I shouldn’t be so quick to assume this is just for fun.

Please tell me it’s just for fun…

 

 

Kind of love that Penguin Random House are putting such wonderful silliness out there.

What’s the oddest non-reading use for books you’ve come across?